High-Protein dieting - Myth Busting & Advice

July 17, 2018

In recent years one of the leading trends across the fitness, health and wellbeing industries has been ‘protein’, or more specifically ‘high protein’. Advertisers, producers, and brands themselves have changed their product recipes and campaigns in order to meet the demand. The Washington Post denotes a perfect example when milk marketers across the US in 2015 ditched their ‘Got Milk’ campaigns in favour of a ‘Milk Life’ campaign that advertised ‘eight grams of protein per glass’ instead of the traditional ‘high calcium and original superfood’ style messaging.

 

Similarly, in the UK, Mars and Snickers have produced high-protein chocolate bars; whilst the quantity of protein-based snacks and drinks on our supermarket shelves seems to increase daily. However, it is important to understand the reasoning and the risks of not paying attention when picking up a product advertised as ‘high protein’. Scientifically proteins are compounds made up of chains of amino acids that make up cells and tissue - essential to all living organisms. Protein also allows the body to build muscle, grow and repair itself.

 

The realisation that protein can help people achieve a healthier, more aesthetically pleasing body as well as making you stronger, and reducing age-related muscle loss has led to a huge demand for high-protein products – which advertisers have pounced upon. In fact, the NPD group suggest ‘71 percent of people want more protein in their diets’. Diets such as Keto and Paleo have added to the demand and even become a recommendation by health services.

 

It is recommended that an average person should consume between 0.75g and 0.8g of protein per kilo of bodyweight per day, with slightly more recommended for those aiming to build muscle.

 

At Healthy Nibbles we advocate and support a high-protein diet, however, we do advise caution when browsing the supermarket shelves. Many products advertised as high-protein also contain large quantities of sugar or artificial sweeteners. For example, Mars Protein has 19g of protein per bar, but they also have 14g of sugar as well, which is clearly unhealthy and is arguably unethical for such brands to advertise their products as healthy.

 

We have always advocated meal preparation at Healthy Nibbles, but when that isn’t possible, having one of our convenient and nutritionally approved snackboxes to hand will support your nutritional needs.

 





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